C Modules

We do write complex software, and like everyone doing so, we need a way to structure our source code. Our choice was to go modular. A module is a singleton that defines a feature or a set of related feature and exposes some APIs in order for other modules to access these features. Everything else, including the details of the implementation, is private. Examples of modules are the RPC layer, the threading library, the query engine of a database, the authentication engine, … Then, we can compose the various daemons of our application by including the corresponding modules and their dependencies.

Most modules maintain an internal state and as a consequence they have to be initialized and deinitialized at some point in the lifetime of the program. An internal rule at Intersec is to name the constructor {module}_initialize() and the destructor {module}_shutdown(). Once defined, these functions have to be called and this is where everything become complicated when your program has tens of modules with complex dependencies between them.

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Hackathon 0x1 – Pimp my Review or the Epic Birth of a Gerrit Plugin

This series of articles describes some of the best realisations made by Intersec R&D team during the 2-day Hackathon that took place on the 3rd and 4th of July.

The goal had been set a day or two prior to the beginning of the hackathon: we were hoping to make Gerrit better at recommending relevant reviewers for a given commit. To those who haven’t heard of it, Gerrit is a web-based code review system. It is a nifty Google-backed open-source project evolving amid an active community of users. We have been using this product here at Intersec since 2011 and some famous software projects also rely heavily on it for their development process.

Da Review Pimpers

This would be a good metaphor to illustrate our mindset at the beginning of the hackathon! (credits: Team Fortress 2)

Our team consisted of five people: Kamal, Romain, Thomas, Louis and Romain (myself).

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Hackathon 0x1 – Interactive mode in Behave

This series of articles describes some of the best realisations made by Intersec R&D team during the 2-day Hackathon that took place on the 3rd and 4th of July.

Presentation of the Project

As testers, we spend a lot of time working on behave, our test automation framework1. Our test framework is a great tool, but it takes a lot of time starting and initializing the product, running tests one by one.

We are not only test automation developers. We also need to explore the product under test by experimenting again and again based on the information we gather along the way. Manual testing is the basic approach to perform non-trivial experiments, but it can benefit from automated testing as it offers a quick and reliable way to set up a product in any given state.

The hackathon2 was the perfect opportunity to buy ourselves a new exploratory tool to perform interactive automated testing. To do that, we needed to be able to:

  • Gain more control over the set up steps
  • Pause the product in order to manually test the state of the product
  • Select some more steps to run, check again, and so on
  • Explore with some automatic help

We elaborated an interactive mode to manage the run of a scenario. The goal was to be able to play each sentence on demand. This mode would help us in the future to reproduce issues and to set up the environment faster for testing purpose or even for customer demonstration.

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  1. behave is a clone of cucumber written in Python. It is based on the BDD (Behavior Driven Development) principles. Tests are described as a succession of english-sentences (assumptions, then actions, then results) which are themselves mapped to the corresponding Python code. 

  2. a hackathon is an event in which computer programmers and others involved in software development, including graphic designers, interface designers and project managers, collaborate intensively on software projects. Intersec promotes this event to focus and enhance project innovation 

First post

At Intersec, technology matters…Because it’s the core of our business, we aim to provide our clients with the most innovative and disruptive technological solutions.
We do not believe in the benefits of reusing and staking external software bricks when developing our products. Our software is built in C language under Linux, with PHP/JavaScript for the web interfaces and it is continuously improved to fit to the simple principle we believe in:
“It appears that perfection is reached not when there is nothing more to add but when there is nothing left to take away.”

Antoine de Saint–Exupéry

This blogs is driven by our Intersec R&D team. We hope to share insights about any technology related subjects, be it programming, code optimization, development tools, best practice etc…
May our experience be useful to others to always thrive for the best.